Choral Curriculum Standards

 

South Carolina

Visual and Performing Arts

Curriculum Standards 2003

 

Office of Curriculum and Standards

South Carolina Department of Education

Columbia, South Carolina

 

Inez Moore Tenenbaum

State Superintendent of Education

 

South Carolina

Visual and Performing Arts

Curriculum Standards

 

 

Preface

 

South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards 2003 presents what all of our state’s children should know and be able to do in the arts. This comprehensive document addresses dance, music, theatre, and visual arts standards from preschool through advanced high school arts courses. It is intended to be used by policy makers, education administrators, teachers, and instructional and community leaders as a concise statement about expectations for learning in the arts and as the basis for curricula, instruction, and assessment in the four arts disciplines.

 

This document represents a statewide consensus that has evolved from the dedicated work of hundreds of educators and artists. The process began with the development of the South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Framework in 1993. The next year, the document National Standards for Arts Education was made available nationwide, and in 1999 the State Department of Education’s South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards was published. Dance, music, theatre, and visual arts students are heirs to excellent arts opportunities and programs because of the vision and resolve of generations of devoted arts educators in our state and throughout the nation. The South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards 2003 should serve as the foundation of a complete quality arts education system.

 

All children deserve access to the rich education that the arts provide, regardless of their background, talents, or disabilities. Students with disabilities can derive great benefit from the arts; therefore, arts specialists should be involved in the planning for the education of students with special needs. Arts specialists should also take part in the planning and implementation of artistically gifted and talented programs. Students in these programs in the elementary and middle grades are expected to achieve all the standards listed at their grade levels as well as to demonstrate higher levels of skills and knowledge, deal with more complex examples, and respond to works of art in increasingly sophisticated ways.

 

The arts standards for young children described in this document were developed through the collaboration of arts specialists and South Carolina Department of Education early childhood consultants. As a result, prekindergarten through kindergarten (preK–K) standards are presented as a separate grade level. The standards for all grades describe the knowledge and skills that should be addressed. However, several preK–K standards start with the phrase “begin to,” which means that student mastery is not expected and that formal assessment is not appropriate for these standards. When the standards continue without the “begin to” phrase, however, mastery and assessment of the grades 1–2 standards are expected. The preK–K visual and performing arts standards were developed with the intention that instruction would be provided in schools (with sufficient arts staff and appropriate funding) by arts specialists or by early childhood teachers who had received extensive professional development in arts education. A systematic collaborative effort between elementary arts specialists and early childhood teachers is highly recommended.

 

Two sets of standards have been created for grades 9–12 because of the enormous differences in the knowledge and skills needed by those students who are specializing in the arts (9–12 advanced). All students are expected to master the 9–12 standards. The advanced standards are provided to help eligible students qualify for honors credit as described in the State Board of Education’s uniform grading policy for students in their third and fourth years of course work.

 

The implementation of the standards will be supported by a companion document that will include exemplary standards-based lessons, examples of classroom assessment, and excellent recommendations for integrating the arts across the curriculum. The companion document will also address technological needs in the arts and will provide a comprehensive overview of the components (e.g., facilities, staff, schedules, resources, equipment) necessary to provide students opportunities to learn the arts standards.

 

Both South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards 2003 and the companion document drew on the expertise of many preK–16 arts teachers and administrators that were nominated by the professional arts education organizations for dance, music, theatre, and visual arts. We are grateful to all that contributed to this effort.

 

The legacy of strong arts education in South Carolina continues.

 

 

Using This Document

 

South Carolina’s curriculum standards for the arts are based on both the content standards and the achievement standards that are set forth in National Standards for Arts Education: What Every Young American Should Know and Be Able to Do in the Arts, a document developed by the Consortium of National Arts Education Associations and published in 1994.

 

In South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards 2003, each of the sections for the four arts disciplines—dance, music, theatre, and visual arts—is introduced by a brief essay that describes and explains the appropriate use of the South Carolina standards in the state’s classrooms. Next, in each of the four sections, the national content standards are given verbatim. These national content standards are also repeated throughout the South Carolina curriculum standards in the primary headings (i.e., those designated with roman numerals).

 

While some changes in the wording of the discipline-specific national achievement standards have been made here, the essential beliefs and intent of these standards remain intact. In addition, our document contains standards that are original and unique to South Carolina.

 

 

South Carolina

Choral Music

Curriculum Standards

 

 

Choral Music Standards for the Individual Grade Levels

 

Grades 6–8/9–12 Intermediate

I.       SINGING. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Students will

  1. Sing with stylistic accuracy and good breath control throughout their singing ranges, alone or in small and large ensembles.
  2. Sing with expression and technical accuracy a repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 2 on scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory.
  3. Sing music representing diverse genres and cultures with expression appropriate for the work they are performing.
  4. Sing music written in two, three, and four parts.
  5. Sing in groups, blending vocal timbres, matching dynamic levels, and responding to the cues of the conductor.

 

II.    PERFORMING ON INSTRUMENTS. Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Students will

  1. Play a classroom instrument accurately and independently in small and large ensembles and alone.
  2. Play rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns with a level of difficulty of 1 to 2 on a scale of 1 to 6 accurately and independently on various types of classroom instruments
  3. Play music representing diverse genres and cultures with expression appropriate for the particular work they are performing.
  4. Play simple melodies and accompaniments on an instrument.

III.    IMPROVISING. Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Students will

  1. Echo simple rhythmic and melodic patterns.
  2. Improvise rhythmic and melodic ostinato accompaniments with a level of difficulty of 1 to 2 on a scale of 1 to 6.
  3. Improvise simple rhythmic variations and simple melodic embellishments on familiar melodies.
  4. Improvise short songs and instrumental pieces (4 to 8 measures) using a variety of sound sources, including traditional sounds, nontraditional sounds available in the classroom, body sounds, and sounds produced by electronic means.

IV.    COMPOSING AND ARRANGING. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines.

Students will

  1. Create compositions in large group settings.
  2. Compose short pieces within specific guidelines.
  3. Arrange simple pieces for voices and/or classroom instruments.
  4. Compose and arrange using a variety of traditional and nontraditional sound sources, including sounds produced by electronic means.

 

V.    READING AND NOTATING. Reading and notating music.

Students will

  1. Read whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, and dotted notes and corresponding rests in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 3/8, and alla breve meter signatures.
  2. Sight-read simple melodies in the appropriate clef with a level of difficulty of 2 on a scale of 1 to 6.
  3. Identify and define standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, articulation, and expression.
  4. Use standard symbols to notate meter, rhythm, pitch, and dynamics in simple patterns presented by the teacher.

VI.    ANALYZING. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music.

Students will

  1. Identify simple musical forms including verse/refrain, canon, AB, and ABA.
  2. Use appropriate terminology to describe specific music events in a given aural example.
  3. Analyze the uses of the elements of music in examples representing diverse genres and cultures.
  4. Analyze music by identifying basic principles of meter, rhythm, tonality, intervals, and chords.
  5. Identify the sounds of a variety of instruments as well as children’s voices and adult male and female voices.
  6. Use purposeful movement to respond to selected prominent music characteristics or to specific music events.

VII.    EVALUATING. Evaluating music and music performances.

Students will

  1. Develop criteria for evaluating the quality and effectiveness of music performances and compositions and apply the criteria to their personal listening, composing, and performing.
  2. Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their own performances and those of others.

VIII.    MAKING CONNECTIONS. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Students will

  1. Explain the similarities and differences in the meanings of common terms used in the various arts disciplines (e.g., “texture,” “color,” “form”).
  2. Explain how the principles and subject matter of other arts disciplines interrelate with those of music.
  3. Explain how the principles and subject matter of other disciplines interrelate with those of music.

 

IX.    RELATING TO HISTORY AND CULTURE. Understanding music in relation to history and culture.

Students will

  1. Describe distinguishing characteristics of representative music genres and styles from a variety of cultures.
  2. Classify by genre and style (and, if applicable, by historical period, composer, and title) a varied body of high-quality musical works and explain the characteristics that cause each work to be exemplary.
  3. Compare and contrast the functions that music serves and the situations in which music is typically performed in various cultures of the world.
  4. Identify the various roles of musicians in society, name representative individuals who have functioned in each role, and describe their activities and achievements.
  5. Demonstrate audience behavior appropriate for the context and style of music being performed.

 

Grades 9–12 Proficient

I.       SINGING. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Students will

  1. Sing with fluency, variety of expression, and increased vocal control, alone and in small and large and ensembles.
  2. Sing with expression and technical accuracy a large and varied repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 4 on a scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory.
  3. Sing, with increased fluency and expression, music in a variety of languages representing a diversity of cultures.
  4. Sing music written in four parts, with or without accompaniment.
  5. Demonstrate ensemble skills in rehearsal and performance.

II.    PERFORMING ON INSTRUMENTS. Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Students will

  1. Play a classroom instrument accurately and independently in small and large ensembles and alone.
  2. Play rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns with a level of difficulty of 3 to 4 on a scale of 1 to 6 accurately and independently on various types of classroom instruments.
  3. Play music representing diverse genres and cultures with expression appropriate for the particular work they are performing.
  4. Play simple melodies and accompaniments on an instrument.

III.    IMPROVISING. Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Students will

  1. Echo more difficult rhythmic and melodic patterns including syncopation, triplets, and dotted rhythms.
  2. Improvise more difficult rhythmic and melodic ostinato accompaniments with a level of difficulty of 3 to 4 on a scale of 1 to 6.
  3. Improvise short melodies both without accompaniment and with basic rhythmic accompaniment.
  4. Improvise extended songs and instrumental pieces (8 to 16 measures) using a variety of sound sources, including traditional sounds, nontraditional sounds available in the classroom, body sounds, and sounds produced by electronic means.

IV.    COMPOSING AND ARRANGING. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines.

Students will

  1. Compare and contrast compositional devices using a variety of pieces in a large group setting.
  2. Compose extended pieces within specific guidelines.
  3. Arrange extended pieces for voices and/or classroom instruments.
  4. Combine traditional and nontraditional sound sources in composing and arranging extended pieces.

V.    READING AND NOTATING. Reading and notating music.

Students will

  1. Read and interpret a vocal score of up to four parts by describing how the elements of music are used in it.
  2. Sight-read, accurately and expressively, music with a level of difficulty of 3 on a scale of 1 to 6.
  3. Identify and define standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, articulation, and expression.
  4. Use standard notation to record musical ideas.

VI.    ANALYZING. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music.

Students will

  1. Identify musical forms including AABA, rondo, and theme and variation.
  2. Use appropriate terminology to describe specific music events in a given aural example.
  3. Analyze aural examples of music representing diverse genres and cultures by describing the elements of music and the expressive devices used in it.
  4. Use the correct technical vocabulary when analyzing and describing musical works.
  5. Recognize and describe timbre in various styles and genres.
  6. Use purposeful movement to respond to a variety of music styles and genres.
  7. Identify and explain compositional devices and techniques used to provide unity, variety, and tension and release in a musical work and give examples of other works that make similar uses of these devices and techniques.
  8. Analyze and describe uses of the elements of music in a given work that make it unique, interesting, and expressive.

VII.    EVALUATING. Evaluating music and music performances.

Students will

  1. Refine and apply specific criteria for making informed critical evaluations of the quality and effectiveness of performances.
  2. Evaluate a performance, arrangement, or improvisation by comparing it to similar or exemplary models.

VIII.    MAKING CONNECTIONS. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Students will

  1. Compare and contrast the uses of characteristic elements, artistic processes, and organizational principles among the arts in different cultures and historical periods.
  2.  Compare and contrast two or more arts disciplines within a particular historical period and cite relevant examples.
  3. Explain how the principles and subject matter of various disciplines outside the arts interrelate with those of music.

 

IX.    RELATING TO HISTORY AND CULTURE. Understanding music in relation to history and culture.

Students will

  1. Describe distinguishing characteristics of representative music genres and styles from a variety of cultures.
  2. Classify music by culture and historical period on the basis of characteristic styles or genres and justify these classifications.
  3. Compare and contrast the functions that music serves and the situations in which music is typically performed in various cultures of the world.
  4. Identify the various roles of musicians in society, name representative individuals who have functioned in each role, and describe their activities and achievements.
  5. Compare and contrast audience behavior appropriate for various musical practices.

 

Grades 9–12 Advanced

I.       SINGING. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Students will

  1. Sing with fluency, variety of expression, and increased vocal control, alone and in small and large and ensembles.
  2. Sing with expression and technical accuracy a large and varied repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 5 on a scale of 1 to 6.
  1. Sing, with increased fluency and expression, music in a variety of languages representing a diversity of cultures.
  1. Sing music written in more than four parts, with or without accompaniment.
  2. Sing in small ensembles with one student to a part.

II.    PERFORMING ON INSTRUMENTS. Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Students will

  1. Play a classroom instrument accurately and independently in small and large ensembles and alone.
  2. Play rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns with a level of difficulty of 3 to 4 on a scale of 1 to 6 accurately and independently on various types of classroom instruments.
  3. Play music representing diverse genres and cultures with expression appropriate for the particular work they are performing.
  4. Play simple melodies and accompaniments on an instrument.

III.    IMPROVISING. Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Students will

  1. Echo more difficult rhythmic and melodic patterns, including syncopation, triplets, and dotted rhythms.
  2. Improvise rhythmic and melodic ostinato accompaniments with a level of difficulty of 3 to 4 on a scale of 1 to 6.
  3. Improvise short melodies both without accompaniment and with basic rhythmic accompaniment.
  4. Improvise extended songs and instrumental pieces (8 to 16 measures) using a variety of sound sources, including traditional sounds, nontraditional sounds available in the classroom, body sounds, and sounds produced by electronic means.

 

IV.    COMPOSING AND ARRANGING. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines.

Students will

  1. Compare and contrast compositional devices using a variety of pieces in a large group setting.
  2. Compose extended pieces within specific guidelines.
  3. Arrange extended pieces for voices and/or classroom instruments.
  4. Combine traditional and nontraditional sound sources in composing and arranging extended pieces.

 

V.    READING AND NOTATING. Reading and notating music.

Students will

  1. Read and interpret a full vocal score by describing how the elements of music are used and explaining all key changes, meters, and clefs.
  2. Sight-read, accurately and expressively, music with a level of difficulty of 4 on a scale of 1 to 6.
  3. Interpret nonstandard notation symbols used by twentieth-century composers.
  4. Use standard notation to record musical ideas.

VI.    ANALYZING. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music.

Students will

  1. Identify musical forms including AABA, rondo, and theme and variation.
  2. Describe in detail significant events occurring in a given musical example.
  3. Analyze aural examples of music representing diverse genres and cultures by describing the elements of music and the expressive devices used in it.
  4. Use the correct technical vocabulary when analyzing and describing musical works.

E.     Recognize and describe timbre in various styles and genres.

F.      Use purposeful movement to respond to a variety of music styles and genres.

  1. Compare ways in which musical materials are used in various works of the same style and genre.
  2. Analyze and describe uses of the elements of music in a given work that make it unique, interesting, and expressive.

VII.    EVALUATING. Evaluating music and music performances.

Students will

  1. Evaluate a given musical work in terms of its aesthetic qualities and explain the musical means it uses to evoke feelings and emotions.
  2. Evaluate a performance, arrangement, or improvisation by comparing it to similar or exemplary models.

VIII.    MAKING CONNECTIONS. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Students will

  1. Compare and contrast the uses of characteristic elements, artistic processes, and organizational principles among the arts in different cultures and historical periods
  2. Compare the ways in which the characteristic media of two or more arts disciplines can be used to transform similar events, scenes, emotions, or ideas into works of art.
  3. Explain how the roles of creators, performers, and others involved in the production and presentation of the various arts are similar to and different from one another.

 

IX.       RELATING TO HISTORY AND CULTURE. Understanding music in relation to history and culture.

Students will

  1. Identify and explain the stylistic features of a given musical work that serves to define its aesthetic tradition and its historical or cultural context.
  2. Identify and describe music genres or styles that show the influence of two or more cultural traditions, identify the cultural source of each influence, and trace the historical conditions that produced the synthesis of influences.
  3. Compare and contrast the functions that music serves and the situations in which music is typically performed in various cultures of the world.
  4. Identify the various roles of musicians in society, name representative individuals who have functioned in each role, and describe their activities and achievements.
  5. Compare and contrast audience behavior appropriate for various musical practices.

 

Choral Music Standards across All Grade Levels

I. SINGING. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Students will

3–5/6–8 Beginning

6–8/9–12 Intermediate

9–12 Proficient

9–12 Advanced

A. Sing independently, on pitch and in rhythm, using appropriate timbre, diction, and posture while maintaining a steady tempo.

A. Sing with stylistic accuracy and good breath control throughout their singing ranges, alone or in small and large ensembles.

A. Sing with fluency, varied expression, and increased vocal control, alone and in small and large and ensembles.

B. Sing expressively— with appropriate dynamics, phrasing, and interpretation—a repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 1 to 2 on a scale of 1 to 6.

B. Sing with expression and technical accuracy a repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 2 on a scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory.

B. Sing with expression and technical accuracy a large and varied repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 4 on a scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory.

B. Sing with expression and technical of accuracy a large and varied repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 5 on a scale of 1 to 6.

C. Sing from memory a varied repertoire of songs representing genres and styles from diverse cultures.

C. Sing music representing diverse genres and cultures with expression appropriate for the work they are performing.

C. Sing, with increased fluency and expression, music in a variety of languages representing a diversity of cultures.

 

D. Sing ostinati, partner songs, rounds, and two- and three-part music.

D. Sing music written in two, three, and four parts.

D. Sing music written in four parts, with or without accompaniment.

D. Sing music written in more than four parts, with or without accompaniment.

E. Sing in groups, blending vocal timbres, matching dynamic levels, and responding to the cues of the conductor.

E. Demonstrate ensemble skills in rehearsal and performance.

E. Sing in small ensembles with one student to a part.

 

 

 


II. PERFORMING ON INSTRUMENTS. Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Students will

3–5/6–8 Beginning

6–8/9–12 Intermediate

9–12 Proficient

9–12 Advanced

 

A. Play a classroom instrument accurately and independently in small and large ensembles and alone.

B. Play rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns with a level of difficulty of 1 to 2 on a scale of 1 to 6 accurately and independently on various types of classroom instruments.

B. Play rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns with a level of difficulty of 3 to 4 on a scale of 1 to 6 accurately and independently on various types of classroom instruments.

 

C. Play music representing diverse genres and cultures with expression appropriate for the particular work they are performing.

 

D. Play simple melodies and accompaniments on an instrument.

 

 

III. IMPROVISING. Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Students will

3–5/6–8 Beginning

6–8/9–12 Intermediate

9–12 Proficient

9–12 Advanced

A. Echo simple rhythmic and melodic patterns.

A. Echo more difficult rhythmic and melodic patterns including syncopation, triplets, and dotted rhythms.

B. Improvise rhythmic and melodic ostinato accompaniments with a level of difficulty of 1 to 2 on a scale of 1 to 6.

B. Improvise rhythmic and melodic ostinato accompaniments with a level of difficulty of 3 to 4 on a scale of 1 to 6.

C. Improvise simple rhythmic variations and simple melodic embellishments on familiar melodies.

C. Improvise short melodies both without accompaniment and with basic rhythmic accompaniment.

D. Improvise short songs and instrumental pieces (4 to 8 measures) using a variety of sound sources, including traditional sounds, nontraditional sounds available in the classroom, body sounds, and sounds produced by electronic means.

D. Improvise extended songs and instrumental pieces (8 to 16 measures) using a variety of sound sources, including traditional sounds, nontraditional sounds available in the classroom, body sounds, and sounds produced by electronic means.

IV. COMPOSING AND ARRANGING. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines.

Students will

3–5/6–8 Beginning

6–8/9–12 Intermediate

9–12 Proficient

9–12 Advanced

A. Create compositions in large group settings.

A. Compare and contrast compositional devices using a variety of pieces in a large group setting.

B. Compose short pieces within specific guidelines.

B. Compose extended pieces within specific guidelines.

C. Arrange simple pieces for voices and/or classroom instruments.

C. Arrange extended pieces for voices and/or classroom instruments.

D. Compose and arrange using a variety of traditional and nontraditional sound sources, including sounds produced by electronic means.

D. Combine traditional and nontraditional sound sources in composing and arranging extended pieces.

 

V. READING AND NOTATING. Reading and notating music.

Students will

3–5/6–8 Beginning

6–8/9–12 Intermediate

9–12 Proficient

9–12 Advanced

A. Read whole, half, dotted half, quarter, and eighth notes and corresponding rests in 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 meter signatures.

A. Read whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, and dotted notes and corresponding rests in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 3/8, and alla breve meter signatures.

A. Read and interpret a vocal score of up to four parts by describing how the elements of music are used in it.

 

A. Read and interpret a full vocal score by describing how the elements of music are used and explaining all key changes, meters, and clefs.

B. Read simple pitch notation in the appropriate clef using a system (syllables, numbers, or letter names).

B. Sight-read simple melodies in the appropriate clef with a level of difficulty of 2 on a scale of 1 to 6.

B. Sight-read, accurately and expressively, music with a level of difficulty of 3 on a scale of 1 to 6.

B. Sight-read, accurately and expressively, music with a level of difficulty of 4 on a scale of 1 to 6.

C. Identify symbols and traditional terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation and interpret them correctly when performing.

C. Identify and define standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, articulation, and expression.

 

C. Interpret nonstandard notation symbols used by twentieth-century composers.

D. Use standard symbols to notate meter, rhythm, pitch, and dynamics in simple patterns presented by the teacher.

D. Use standard notation to record musical ideas.

 

VI. ANALYZING. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music.

Students will

3–5/6–8 Beginning

6–8/9–12 Intermediate

9–12 Proficient

9–12 Advanced

A. Identify simple musical forms including verse/refrain, canon, AB, and ABA.

A. Identify musical forms including AABA, rondo, and theme and variation.

B. Demonstrate perceptual skills by moving as well as describing and answering questions about aural examples of music in various styles representing diverse cultures.

B. Use appropriate terminology to describe specific music events in a given aural example.

 

B. Describe in detail significant events occurring in a given musical example.

 

C. Analyze the uses of the elements of music in examples representing diverse genres and cultures.

C. Analyze aural examples of music representing diverse genres and cultures by describing the elements of music and the expressive devices used in it.

D. Use appropriate terminology when explaining music notation, music instruments and voices, and music performances.

D. Analyze music by identifying basic principles of meter, rhythm, tonality, intervals, and chords.

D. Use the correct technical vocabulary when analyzing and describing musical works.

 

E. Identify the sounds of a variety of instruments as well as children’s voices and adult male and female voices.

E. Recognize and describe timbre in various styles and genres.

F. Use purposeful movement to respond to selected prominent music characteristics or to specific music events.

F. Use purposeful movement to respond to a variety of music styles and genres.


 

G. Identify and explain compositional devices and techniques used to provide unity, variety, and tension and release in a musical work and give examples of other works that make similar uses of these devices and techniques.

G. Compare ways in which musical materials are used in various works of the same style and genre.

H. Analyze and describe uses of the elements of music in a given work that make it unique, interesting, and expressive.

 

 

VII. EVALUATING. Evaluating music and music performances.

Students will

3–5/6–8 Beginning

6–8/9–12 Intermediate

9–12 Proficient

9–12 Advanced

A. Devise criteria for evaluating performances and compositions.

A. Develop criteria for evaluating the quality and effectiveness of music performances and compositions and apply the criteria to personal listening, composing, and performing.

A. Refine and apply specific criteria for making informed critical evaluations of the quality and effectiveness of performances.

A. Evaluate a given musical work in terms of its aesthetic qualities and explain the musical means it uses to evoke feelings and emotions.

B. Use appropriate music terminology to explain their personal preferences for specific music works and styles.

B. Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their own performances and the those of others.

B. Evaluate a performance, arrangement, or improvisation by comparing it to similar or exemplary models.

 

 

VIII. MAKING CONNECTIONS. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Students will

3–5/6–8 Beginning

6–8/9–12 Intermediate

9–12 Proficient

9–12 Advanced

A. Identify similarities and differences in the meanings of common terms used in the various arts disciplines (e.g., “texture,” “color,” “form”).

A. Explain the similarities and differences in the meanings of common terms used in the various arts disciplines (e.g., “texture,” “color,” “form”).

A. Compare and contrast the uses of characteristic elements, artistic processes, and organizational principles among the arts in different cultures and historical periods.

B. Explain how the principles and subject matter of other arts disciplines interrelate with those of music.

B. Compare and contrast two or more arts disciplines within a particular historical period and cite relevant examples.

B. Compare the ways in which the characteristic media of two or more disciplines areas can be used to transform similar events, scenes, emotions, or ideas into works of art.

C. Explain how the principles and subject matter of other disciplines interrelate with those of music.

 

C. Explain how the principles and subject matter of various disciplines outside the arts interrelate with those of music.

C. Explain how the roles of creators, performers, and others involved in the production and presentation of the various arts are similar to and different from one another.

 

 



IX. RELATING TO HISTORY AND CULTURE. Understanding music in relation to history and culture.

Students will

3–5/6–8 Beginning

6–8/9–12 Intermediate

9–12 Proficient

9–12 Advanced

A. Perform a varied repertoire of music from other cultures.

A. Describe distinguishing characteristics of representative music genres and styles from a variety of cultures.

A. Identify and explain the stylistic features of a given musical work that serve to define its aesthetic tradition and its historical or cultural context.

B. Perform music from various historical periods.

B. Classify by genre and style (and, if applicable, by historical period, composer, and title) a varied body of high quality musical works and explain the characteristics that cause each work to be exemplary.

B. Classify music by culture and historical period on the basis of characteristic styles or genres and justify these classifications.

B. Identify and describe music genres or styles that show the influence of two or more cultural traditions, identify the cultural source of each influence, and trace the historical conditions that produced the synthesis of influences.

C. Identify various uses of music in their daily experiences and describe characteristics that make certain music suitable for each use.

C. Compare and contrast the functions that music serves and the situations in which music is typically performed in various cultures of the world.

 

 

D. Identify and describe roles of musicians in various music settings and cultures.

D. Identify the various roles of musicians in society, name representative individuals who have functioned in each role, and describe their activities and achievements.

E. Demonstrate audience behavior appropriate for the context and style of music being performed.

E. Compare and contrast audience behavior appropriate for various musical practices.