Visual Arts Curriculum Standards

 

South Carolina

Visual and Performing Arts

Curriculum Standards 2003

 

Office of Curriculum and Standards

South Carolina Department of Education

Columbia, South Carolina

 

Inez Moore Tenenbaum

State Superintendent of Education

 

South Carolina

Visual and Performing Arts

Curriculum Standards

 

 

Preface

 

South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards 2003 presents what all of our state’s children should know and be able to do in the arts. This comprehensive document addresses dance, music, theatre, and visual arts standards from preschool through advanced high school arts courses. It is intended to be used by policy makers, education administrators, teachers, and instructional and community leaders as a concise statement about expectations for learning in the arts and as the basis for curricula, instruction, and assessment in the four arts disciplines.

 

This document represents a statewide consensus that has evolved from the dedicated work of hundreds of educators and artists. The process began with the development of the South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Framework in 1993. The next year, the document National Standards for Arts Education was made available nationwide, and in 1999 the State Department of Education’s South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards was published. Dance, music, theatre, and visual arts students are heirs to excellent arts opportunities and programs because of the vision and resolve of generations of devoted arts educators in our state and throughout the nation. The South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards 2003 should serve as the foundation of a complete quality arts education system.

 

All children deserve access to the rich education that the arts provide, regardless of their background, talents, or disabilities. Students with disabilities can derive great benefit from the arts; therefore, arts specialists should be involved in the planning for the education of students with special needs. Arts specialists should also take part in the planning and implementation of artistically gifted and talented programs. Students in these programs in the elementary and middle grades are expected to achieve all the standards listed at their grade levels as well as to demonstrate higher levels of skills and knowledge, deal with more complex examples, and respond to works of art in increasingly sophisticated ways.

 

The arts standards for young children described in this document were developed through the collaboration of arts specialists and South Carolina Department of Education early childhood consultants. As a result, prekindergarten through kindergarten (preK–K) standards are presented as a separate grade level. The standards for all grades describe the knowledge and skills that should be addressed. However, several preK–K standards start with the phrase “begin to,” which means that student mastery is not expected and that formal assessment is not appropriate for these standards. When the standards continue without the “begin to” phrase, however, mastery and assessment of the grades 1–2 standards are expected. The preK–K visual and performing arts standards were developed with the intention that instruction would be provided in schools (with sufficient arts staff and appropriate funding) by arts specialists or by early childhood teachers who had received extensive professional development in arts education. A systematic collaborative effort between elementary arts specialists and early childhood teachers is highly recommended.

 

Two sets of standards have been created for grades 9–12 because of the enormous differences in the knowledge and skills needed by those students who are specializing in the arts (9–12 advanced). All students are expected to master the 9–12 standards. The advanced standards are provided to help eligible students qualify for honors credit as described in the State Board of Education’s uniform grading policy for students in their third and fourth years of course work.

 

The implementation of the standards will be supported by a companion document that will include exemplary standards-based lessons, examples of classroom assessment, and excellent recommendations for integrating the arts across the curriculum. The companion document will also address technological needs in the arts and will provide a comprehensive overview of the components (e.g., facilities, staff, schedules, resources, equipment) necessary to provide students opportunities to learn the arts standards.

 

Both South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards 2003 and the companion document drew on the expertise of many preK–16 arts teachers and administrators that were nominated by the professional arts education organizations for dance, music, theatre, and visual arts. We are grateful to all that contributed to this effort.

 

The legacy of strong arts education in South Carolina continues.

 

 

Using This Document

 

South Carolina’s curriculum standards for the arts are based on both the content standards and the achievement standards that are set forth in National Standards for Arts Education: What Every Young American Should Know and Be Able to Do in the Arts, a document developed by the Consortium of National Arts Education Associations and published in 1994.

 

In South Carolina Visual and Performing Arts Curriculum Standards 2003, each of the sections for the four arts disciplines—dance, music, theatre, and visual arts—is introduced by a brief essay that describes and explains the appropriate use of the South Carolina standards in the state’s classrooms. Next, in each of the four sections, the national content standards are given verbatim. These national content standards are also repeated throughout the South Carolina curriculum standards in the primary headings (i.e., those designated with roman numerals).

 

While some changes in the wording of the discipline-specific national achievement standards have been made here, the essential beliefs and intent of these standards remain intact. In addition, our document contains standards that are original and unique to South Carolina.

 

 

 

South Carolina

Visual Arts

Curriculum Standards

 

 

 

Introduction

 

 

The South Carolina curriculum standards for visual arts are aligned with the national standards for art education and have been developed from the previous state standards and the national standards. While the previous South Carolina standards organized according to the four fundamental components of discipline-based art education (DBAE)—creative expression, aesthetic perception, historical and cultural perception, and aesthetic valuing—the new standards are organized on the basis of six curriculum standards. The four components are still included, however, and are listed with the appropriate curriculum standards. The component “creative expression,” for example, is subsumed under the content standards “Understanding and Applying Media, Techniques, and Processes” and “Choosing and Evaluating a Range of Subject Matter, Symbols, and Ideas.”

 

Several of the curriculum standards are repeated across the grade levels. Teachers should understand that these standards need to be reinforced throughout these grades as the students begin to use more advanced tools and media as well as more complex terminology and begin to study of art concepts in depth.

 

 National Visual Arts Content Standards

I.       Understanding and Applying Media, Techniques, and Processes

Creative Expression. Students will develop and expand their knowledge of visual arts media, techniques, and processes in order to express ideas creatively in their artworks.

II.    Using Knowledge of Structures and Functions

Aesthetic Perception/Creative Expression. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the elements and principles of design and show an aesthetic awareness of the visual and tactile qualities in the environment that are found in works of art.

III.    Choosing and Evaluating a Range of Subject Matter, Symbols, and Ideas

Creative Expression/Aesthetic Valuing. Students will use a variety of subjects, symbols, and ideas in creating original artwork and will evaluate the use of these elements in the artworks of others.

IV.    Understanding the Visual Arts in Relation to History and Cultures

Historical and Cultural Perception. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of artists, art history, and world cultures and will understand how the visual arts reflect, record, and shape cultures.

V.    Reflecting upon and Assessing the Merits of Their Work and the Work of Others

Historical and Cultural Perception/Aesthetic Valuing. Students will use thorough analysis, interpretation, and judgment to make informed responses to their own artworks and those of others.

VI.    Making Connections between Visual Arts and Other Disciplines

Historical and Cultural Perception. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the connections among the content of visual arts, other disciplines, and everyday life.


 

Visual Arts Standards for the Individual Grade Levels

 

Grades 9–12

 

I.       Understanding and Applying Media, Techniques, and Processes

Students will

A.    Communicate ideas through the effective use of media, techniques, and processes in their artworks.

B.     Apply media, techniques, and processes with skill, confidence, and sensitivity sufficient to make their intentions observable in their artworks.

C.     Demonstrate the skillful, safe, and responsible application of a variety of media, tools, and equipment.

 

II.    Using Knowledge of Structures and Functions

Students will

A.    Identify and describe the interrelationships among the elements and principles of design that communicate a variety of artistic perspectives and purposes.

B.     Create artworks that use appropriate structures and functions to solve specific visual arts problems.

C.     Evaluate the effectiveness of artworks in terms of structure and function.

 

III.    Choosing and Evaluating a Range of Subject Matter, Symbols, and Ideas

Students will

A.    Make personal choices and formulate interpretations regarding symbols, subject matter, ideas, and expression in artworks.

B.     Use the appropriate art vocabulary and concepts to make and defend aesthetic judgments about the validity of the source and content of their own artworks and significant artworks of others.

 

IV.    Understanding the Visual Arts in Relation to History and Cultures

Students will

A.    Describe how the subject matter, symbols, and ideas in various artworks are related to history and culture.

B.     Explain how a variety of artworks, artists, and visual arts materials represent and reflect the history and culture of South Carolina.

C.     Describe the function and explore the meaning of specific artworks from various cultures, periods, and regions of the world.

 

V.       Reflecting upon and Assessing the Merits of Their Work and the Work of Others

Students will

A.    Analyze the intention of the artist in a particular work and justify their interpretation of that intention.

B.     Make complex descriptive, interpretive, and evaluative judgments about their own artworks and those of others.

C.     Formulate criteria for interpreting and evaluating their own artworks and those of others.

D.    Present and defend a portfolio of personal artwork.

VI.    Making Connections between Visual Arts and Other Disciplines

Students will

A.    Compare the materials, technologies, media, and processes of the visual arts with those of other arts disciplines.

B.     Compare and contrast issues and themes in the visual arts with those in the humanities or the sciences.

C.     Identify specific visual and performing arts careers and describe the knowledge and skills required for these careers.

 

Grades 9–12 Advanced

I.       Understanding and Applying Media, Techniques, and Processes

Students will

  1. Demonstrate mastery of at least one visual arts medium through the effective use of technique and processes in the communication of ideas.
  2. Identify, define, and solve challenging visual arts problems independently.
  3. Demonstrate the skillful, safe, and responsible application of a variety of media, tools, and equipment.

II.    Using Knowledge of Structures and Functions

Students will

  1. Compare and contrast the structural organization of various artworks and defend their interpretation.
  2. Address specific visual arts problems by creating multiple solutions that demonstrate effective relationships between structural choices and artistic functions.
  3. Evaluate the effectiveness of artworks in terms of structure and function.

III.    Choosing and Evaluating a Range of Subject Matter, Symbols, and Ideas

Students will

  1. Analyze the origins of specific images and ideas and explain why these elements are of value in their own artworks and in those of others.
  2. Use the appropriate art vocabulary and concepts to make and defend aesthetic judgments about the validity of the source and content of their own artworks and significant artworks of others.

IV.    Understanding the Visual Arts in Relation to History and Cultures

Students will

  1. Analyze and interpret artworks as critics, historians, and artists to determine relationships among form, context, and purposes.
  2. Analyze, evaluate, and interpret characteristics of the visual arts that exist across time and among diverse cultural and ethnic groups.
  3. Describe the function and explore the meaning of specific artworks from various cultures, periods, and regions of the world.

V.    Reflecting upon and Assessing the Merits of Their Work and the Work of Others

Students will

A.    Correlate viewer responses to artworks with various artistic techniques for communicating meanings, ideas, and intentions.

B.     Use complex descriptors and analogies to explain how visual and tactile qualities are perceived aesthetically.

C.     Formulate criteria for interpreting and evaluating their own artworks and those of others.

D.    Present and defend a portfolio of personal artwork.

VI.      Making Connections between Visual Arts and Other Disciplines

Students will

  1. Compare concepts and techniques in the visual arts with those in other disciplines and express the connections either orally, in writing, or in a work of art.
  2. Compare and contrast issues and themes in the visual arts with those in the humanities or the sciences.
  3. Identify specific visual and performing arts careers and describe the knowledge and skills required for these careers.
 
Visual Arts Standards across All Grade Levels
I.  Understanding and Applying Media, Techniques, and Processes

Creative Expression. Students will develop and expand their knowledge of visual arts media, techniques, and processes in order to express ideas creatively in their artworks.

Students will

PreK–K

1–2

3–5

6–8

9–12

9–12 Advanced

A. Begin to identify differences among media, techniques, and processes used in the visual arts.

A. Identify differences among media, techniques, and processes used in the visual arts.

A. Describe how different media, techniques, and processes evoke different responses in the viewer of an artwork.

A. Communicate ideas through the effective use of media, techniques, and processes in their artworks.

A. Demonstrate mastery of at least one visual arts medium through the effective use of techniques and processes in the communication of ideas.

B. Use a variety of media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories through their artworks.

B. Select and apply the most effective media, techniques, and processes to communicate their experiences and ideas through their artworks.

B. Apply media, techniques, and processes with skill, confidence, and sensitivity sufficient to make their intentions observable in their artworks.

B. Identify, define, and solve challenging visual arts problems independently.

C. Use art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner.

C. Demonstrate the skillful, safe, and responsible application of a variety of media, tools, and equipment.

 


II.  Using Knowledge of Structures and Functions

Aesthetic Perception/Creative Expression. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the elements and principles of design and show an aesthetic awareness of the visual and tactile qualities in the environment that are found in works of art.

Students will

PreK–K

1–2

3–5

6–8

9–12

9–12 Advanced

A. Identify some elements and principles of design in the visual arts.

A. Identify elements and principles of design that are found in nature and those that have been created by human beings.

A. Describe, both orally and in writing, how the various elements and principles of design function to evoke different responses in the viewer of an artwork.

A. Analyze and describe, using the appropriate vocabulary, the composition of a particular artwork with regard to the elements and principles of design that it manifests.

A. Identify and describe the interrelationships among the elements and principles of design that communicate a variety of artistic perspectives and purposes.

A. Compare and contrast the structural organization of various artworks and defend their interpretation.

B. Use some elements and principles of design to communicate ideas through their artworks.

B. Use various elements and principles of design to communicate ideas through their artworks.

B. Select and use various elements and principles of design to communicate personal ideas through their artworks.

B. Create artworks by using elements and principles of design that are appropriate for good composition and for the communication of the particular ideas.

B. Create artworks that use appropriate structures and functions to solve specific visual arts problems.

B. Address specific visual arts problems by creating multiple solutions that demonstrate effective relationships between structural choices and artistic functions.

 

C. Evaluate the effectiveness of artworks in terms of structure and function.

 

III.  Choosing and Evaluating a Range of Subject Matter, Symbols, and Ideas

        Creative Expression/Aesthetic Valuing. Students will use a variety of subjects, symbols, and ideas in creating         original artwork and will evaluate the use of these elements in the artworks of others.

Students will

 

PreK–K

1–2

3–5

6–8

9–12

9–12 Advanced

A. Create artworks that express their personal experiences.

A. Select and use subject matter, symbols, and ideas to communicate meaning through their artworks.

A. Use visual metaphors and symbols in an artwork to convey meaning.

 

A. Make personal choices and formulate interpretations regarding symbols, subject matter, ideas, and expression in artworks.

A. Analyze the origins of specific images and ideas and explain why these elements are of value in their own artworks and in those of others.

B. Describe their personal responses to various subjects, symbols, and ideas in artworks.

B. Evaluate how particular choices of subject matter, symbols, and ideas function to communicate meaning in their own artworks and those of others.

B. Analyze and describe the relationships among subjects, themes, and symbols in communicating intended meaning through their own artworks and in interpreting the artworks of others.

B. Use the appropriate art vocabulary and concepts to make and defend aesthetic judgments about the validity of the source and content of their own artworks and significant artworks of others.

 

IV.  Understanding the Visual Arts in Relation to History and Cultures

Visual Arts Heritage. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of artists, art history, and world cultures and will understand how the visual arts reflect, record, and shape cultures.

Students will

PreK–K

1–2

3–5

6–8

9–12

9–12 Advanced

A. Begin to identify specific artworks and styles as belonging to particular artists, cultures, periods, and places.

A. Identify specific artworks and styles as belonging to particular artists, cultures, periods, and places.

A. Compare and contrast the characteristics of artworks from various cultures and historical periods.

A. Describe how the subject matter, symbols, and ideas in various artworks are related to history and culture.

 

A. Analyze and interpret artworks, as critics, historians, and artists, to determine relationships among form, context, and purposes.

B. Begin to identify a variety of artworks, artists, and visual arts materials that exist in their community.

B. Identify a variety of artworks, artists, and visual arts materials that exist in their community.

B. Identify a variety of artworks, artists, and visual arts materials that exist in South Carolina.

B. Compare and contrast a variety of artworks, artists, and visual arts materials that exist in South Carolina.

B. Explain how a variety of artworks, artists, and visual arts materials represent and reflect the history and culture of South Carolina.

 

B. Analyze, evaluate, and interpret characteristics of the visual arts that exist across time and among diverse cultural and ethnic groups.

 

C. Describe how history, culture, and the visual arts can influence one another.

C. Analyze, describe, and demonstrate how factors of time and place such as climate, resources, ideas, and technology influence visual characteristics that give meaning and value to a work of art.

C. Describe the function and explore the meaning of specific artworks from various cultures, periods, and regions of the world.

V. Reflecting upon and Assessing the Merits of Their Work and the Work of Others

Aesthetic Valuing/Visual Arts Heritage. Students will use thorough analysis, interpretation, and judgment to make informed responses to their own artworks and those of others.

Students will

PreK–K

1–2

3–5

6–8

9–12

9–12 Advanced

A. Identify some purposes for creating artworks.

A. Identify various purposes for creating artworks.

A. Describe how an artist’s experiences can influence the development of his or her artworks.

A. Compare various of purposes for creating artworks.

A. Analyze the intention of the artist in a particular work and justify their interpretation of that intention.

A. Correlate viewer responses to artworks with various artistic techniques for communicating meanings, ideas, and intentions.

 

B. Compare and contrast the expressive qualities in nature with those found in artworks.

B. Analyze their own artworks and those of others and describe improvements that could be made.

B. Use descriptive, interpretive, and evaluative statements to make informed aesthetic judgments about their own artworks and those of others.

B. Make complex descriptive, interpretive, and evaluative judgments about their own artworks and those of others.

B. Use complex descriptors and analogies to explain how visual and tactile qualities are perceived aesthetically.

 

C. Distinguish between personal preference and the objective analysis of artworks.

C. Analyze, interpret, and evaluate their visual preferences in their own artworks, in nature, and in artworks from various cultures and historical periods.

C. Formulate criteria for interpreting and evaluating their own artworks and those of others

 

D. Collect, maintain, and exhibit a portfolio of personal artwork.

D. Present and defend a portfolio of personal artwork.

VI.  Making Connections between Visual Arts and Other Disciplines

Visual Arts Heritage/Integration. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the connections among the content of visual arts, other disciplines, and everyday life.

Students will

PreK–K

1–2

3–5

6–8

9–12

9–12 Advanced

 

A. Distinguish between utilitarian and nonutilitarian art.

A. Compare and contrast characteristics of the visual arts and other arts disciplines.

A. Compare the characteristics of works in two or more art forms that have similar subject matter, historical periods, or cultural contexts.

A. Compare the materials, technologies, media, and processes of the visual arts with those of other arts.

A. Compare concepts and techniques in the visual arts with those in other disciplines and express the connections either orally, in writing, or in a work of art.

B. Begin to identify connections between the visual arts and content areas across the curriculum.

B. Identify connections between the visual arts and content areas across the curriculum.

B. Identify connections among the visual arts, other arts disciplines, and content areas across the curriculum.

B. Compare and contrast concepts and subject matter found in the visual arts with those in other disciplines.

B. Compare and contrast issues and themes in the visual arts with those in the humanities or the sciences.

 

C. Recognize career opportunities in the visual arts.

C. Identify visual arts careers and the knowledge and skills required for specific art careers.

C. Identify specific visual and performing arts careers and describe the knowledge and skills required for these careers.